Scenes of The Wheatfield

Red Diamonds in the -Wheatfield 17th Maine Regiment

Red Diamonds in the Wheatfield

12" x 20" Framed Print $59.95 and 22" x 34" Framed Print $99.95

      While another regiment from Maine commands the liWhile another regiment from Maine commands the lion’s share of public awareness, it can be argued that the 17th Maine fought the hardest of the Down Easters. At Gettysburg the 17th was in DeTrobriand’s Brigade, assigned the unenviable task of holding the gap between Ward’s Brigade on Devil’s Den and the Peach Orchard, a huge distance with few natural defensive positions. As it became clear that Longstreet was attacking from the southwest, the 17th was moved to a low stone wall on the southern part of George Rose’s Wheatfield. A more claustrophobic position could not be imagined. The wall was in a natural basin hemmed in on the left and rear by the extension of Houck’s Ridge and the right by Stony Hill and a grove of alders. In the immediate front was Rose Woods. 

       The enemy could emerge from any or all of the three directions. If that was not disconcerting enough, immediately to their rear Winslow’s Battery of 6 Napoleons was firing over their heads into Rose Woods, presumably at the Confederates.  was in DeTrobriand’s Brigade, assigned the unenviable task of holding the gap between Ward’s Brigade on Devil’s Den and the Peach Orchard, a huge distance with few natural defensive positions. At Gettysburg the 17th Maine may have fought the hardest of the Down Easters. 

            For the next 2 hours the 17th fought against elements of 3 Southern Brigades holding a weak defensive position against heavy odds. Out of ammunition they were finally ordered to pull back to the north end of the Wheatfield. There Division Commander, General David Birney order them to give one more effort to gain time for the arrival of Caldwell’s II Corps Division. They set bayonets and charged back down the slope of the Wheatfield, stalling the Confederate advance and allowing Winslow to withdraw safely.

          Here we see the scene about 45 minutes into the fight. Anderson’s 11th Georgia is applying pressure on the stone wall. Two Union Regiments to 17th’s right had evacuated Stony Hill and created a potentially fatal gap.  In response Lt. Colonel Charles Merrill thinned his line and moved 3 companies to the Virginia rail fence that cut diagonally across the base of the Wheatfield. This refusal was done just in time to repel elements of the 8th Georgia who had nearly outflanked the 17th Maine.
 

12” x 20”  signed limited ed. canvas print(100) w/certificate of authenticity-Framed w/brass plate                          $59.95 plus shipping -Deluxe frame Add $10.00  22” x 34” signed limited edition stretched print (50) w/certificate of authenticity  Framed w/brass plate           $99.95 plus shipping -Deluxe frame Add $10.00

Located in the Wheatfield Category

118th Pennsylvania on Stony Hill

12" x 20" Framed Print $59.95 and 22" x 34" Framed Print $99.95

          The 118th had one of the more unusual nicknames in the Civil War. They were known as the “Corn Exchange Regiment” due to their monetary sponsorship by the Philadelphia Corn Exchange. The Exchange paid the volunteer’s bounty and other expenses involving the creation of the Regiment.
            The 118th took heavy losses at Shepardstown and was heavily engaged at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. At Gettysburg the Corn Exchange served in Colonel William Tilton’s tiny (655 men in four regiments) Brigade in Barnes Division, V corps.  
            The V corps arrived at Gettysburg early on the 2nd of July, 1863. Starting in reserve, as fighting started in the area of the III corps it was moved to the southern part of the Union position. Along the way Strong Vincent’s Brigade was peeled off to assist on Little Round Top and the remaining two brigades of  Barnes’s division continued to another rocky eminence located on George Rose’s farm just west of a large and soon to be infamous Wheatfield. There a rocky knoll fronted a small woodlot between the Wheatfield and several open fields next to Sherfy’s Peach Orchard. General Sickles of the III created a large salient at the Peach Orchard but to its left the area was weakly defended.
            Directly in front of the 118th was a narrow gap in Roses’ woodlot containing a small run and a farm road.  Prior to the 118th’s arrival Confederates of “Tige” Anderson had attacked from the woods closer to the Wheatfield but had been repulsed. It was clear more were coming as more Confederate ranks could be seen crossing the Emmitsburg Road behind the Rose House.
            This scene shows the 7th South Carolina (left) and 3rd South Carolina of Kershaw’s Brigade attacking Stony Hill. The 118th held firm for a time Lt. Colonel James Gwynn refused back the right of his line to cover an overlap by the Southerners.
              Colonel Tilton, new to Brigade command, lost his nerve. The left wing of Kershaw’s Brigade had passed far to the right on the 118th. Tilton did not know they had been battered by Union Artillery on the Wheatfield Road. With Barnes consent both brigades pulled off Stony Hill to a position behind the Wheatfield Road. With that Kershaw’s men swept across woodlots and started to move into the Wheatfield.


12” x 20”  signed limited ed. canvas print(100) w/certificate of authenticity-Framed w/brass plate                 $59.95 plus shipping -Deluxe frame Add $10.00  22” x 34” signed limited edition stretched print (50) w/certificate of authenticity  Framed w/brass plate           $99.95 plus shipping -Deluxe frame Add $10.00


Located in the Wheatfield Category

8th Georgia in Rose's Muck

12" x 30" framed Canvas print $69.95

      The 8th Georgia Regiment arrived in Virginia in 1861 and participated in 1st Manassas as part of Bartow’s Brigade. The 8th came to Gettysburg with 311 men as part of  “Tige“ Anderson’s Brigade of Hood’s Division. In Longstreet’s late afternoon attack on July 2, 1863 the 8th Georgia was led by Colonel John Towers. Initially they  moved east across the Emmitsburg Road and suffered from Union artillery located in the Peach Orchard. Some relief arrived in a 30- some acre woodlot owned by George Rose. There Anderson’s brigade swung generally to the North. Off in that direction beyond the woods  the men of the 8th could see glimpses of golden wheat. Shells from an unseen northern battery exploded overhead with little physical effect but with obvious damage to nerves.  As they descended a slight slope leading to Rose’s Run  it became clear the Union lines were directly ahead.

       This Panoramic  print shows the scene as the 8th Georgia crosses the low swampy area of Rose Run during the first of at least three assaults on the Wheatfield. The 17th Maine is at the foreground and had the advantage of a low stone wall to the right. Their right flank was exposed by a hasty withdrawal of troops on their right but a quick refusal by the 17th along a snake fence kept the Eighth from pushing into the field. The Eighth did manage to advance it flag to the stone wall where hand to hand fighting ensued before Anderson pulled his brigade back.  The 8th Georgia continued to fight until dusk as both sided flooded the area with new troops. Eventually the Wheatfield was carried but the 8th suffered a staggering 168 casualties (54%) .
 

12” x 20”  signed limited ed. canvas print(100) w/certificate of authenticity-Framed w/brass plate                $59.95 plus shipping -Deluxe frame Add $10.00  

Located in the Wheatfield Category

Anderson Enters the Wheatfield

Anderson Enters the Wheatfield

11" X 22" CanvasPrint with Frame-$59.95

General George T. Anderson’s Brigade was the last of Hood’s Division to attack. After initially suffering losses from Union Artillery crossing Emmitsburg Road and the open fields nearby, the five Georgia regiments moved through Rose Woods until making contact with Union forces. For almost an hour they fought with elements of four Union Brigades without breaking clear of the Woods. Finally, pulling back to regroup they joined in with Semmes and Kershaw’s Brigade in clearing the Federals out Stoney Hill and the Wheatfield.

The diograph shows the 11th and 8th Georgia Regiments finally moving across the Wheatfield after the 1 ½ hour struggle to make it out of Rose Woods. The 17th Maine, now out of ammunition, has given Winslow’s Battery time to withdraw and now itself cedes the field it had held so dearly. At this point the Southerners have no way of knowing that the first of General William Caldwell’s four Union brigades was lining up just over the crest of the field ready to commence another one of the Wheatfield’s six changes of possession for that day. 

11” x 22”  signed limited ed. canvas print(50) w/certificate of authenticity-Framed w/brass plate                 $59.95 plus shipping -Deluxe frame Add $10.00  

Located in the Wheatfield Category

Brooke's Charge

12" x 20" Framed Canvas Print $59.95

At about 5:15 PM Anderson and Kershaw’s Brigade had cleared all Union Troops and Artillery from the Wheatfield. As General Kershaw looked over the crest of the field toward Trostle Woods he could see fresh Union troops ready to attack. These were the Brigades of Caldwell’s division, part of the II corps brought south from Cemetery Ridge to help fill the gap that was opening in the Union line between Little Round Top and the Peach Orchard. Cross and Zook's’ Brigades moved forward on the East and West edges, respectively, of the Wheatfield, though both commanders would be mortally wounded. The Irish Brigade went third but it was too small to fill the gap between Zook and Cross. John R. Brooke’s Brigade of 850 men in 5 small regiments was supposed to be in reserve but Caldwell ordered them to attack. They moved to the crest of the field and exchanged volleys with the Confederates in the lower part of the field and Rose Woods. After several minutes Brooke gave the order to fix bayonets and charge. They did and the enemy gave way. In perhaps the most effective Union Brigade attack of the Battle, Brooke’s Brigade pushed the Confederates out of the Wheatfield into Rose Wood and then completely out of the Woods. Critics have stated that Brooke overreached, but this attack was the only time in 3 days that a Union force took ground that it did not hold prior to the battle.

In the view above Brooke’s Brigade is just starting the charge down the slope of the Wheatfield. The Irish Brigade is visible at right battling Kershaw in the woods on Stoney Hill. Brooke’s Brigade held the ground at the edge of Rose Woods until they ran low on ammunition.
 

11"x22" signed limited edition print(50) with certificate of authenticity

Framed with brass plate $59.95 plus shipping($10.00 in US) 

Located in the Wheatfield Category