The Gettysburg Diographs by Dennis Morris
Historical Prints
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                                                                 "Jersey Blue Collision"
                                                                          12" x 20" Print
                                                            

                        The 7th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry Regiment was formed in September 1861, at Camp Olden in Trenton.  The regiment saw action at the battles of Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Oak Grove, Savage Station, and Malvern Hill. Later in 1862, the 7th participated in General Pope's campaign in northern Virginia, fighting at Bristoe Station, Groveton, Bull Run, and Chantilly.  In December,  1862, the 7th fought at bloody Fredericksburg, in May of 1863.  
                         
                         As result of that continuous action the 7th arrived at Gettysburg with only 275 active troops. Assigned to Burling’s Brigade of Sickles’ III Corps, the New Jersey veterans   initially were held in reserve near the Trostle Farm on July 2.  Sometime around 6:00 PM the Union salient in the Peach Orchard began to fall. A pincer movement of Kershaw’s and Barksdale’s Confederate Brigades made the Peach Orchard untenable.  The 7th New Jersey under Lt. Colonel Lewis Francine moved forward up the slope toward the Peach Orchard.  The advance was not smooth as retreating III corps regiments passed through the 7th’s ranks.  Even more distressing was a headlong rush of several limbers and caissons of  Captain Judson Clark’s 1ST New Jersey Light Artillery.  The six horse teams and their trails split the 7th in half and slowed the advance considerably.

                      This print depicts Clark’s Battery escaping  from the Peach Orchard vortex, bisecting the  7th New Jersey as they attempt to move toward Wheatfield Road.  Just behind the 7th are portions of the 3rd Maine and 2nd New Hampshire trying to hold off the 21st Mississippi, just visible on the horizon. On the far right is  the Wertz barn and house located at the corner of the Emmitsburg Road and Wheatfield road. After reforming and continuing to charge forward Francine was mortally wounded. Major Frederick Cooper took over command as the Garden Staters’ tried to stem the Confederate advance.   Despite the brevity of their stand the 7th suffered 114 casualties, more than 40% of their complement. 

12" x 20" signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
Print on gloss canvas $35.95plus shipping($10.00 in US)
Framed with brass plate
$59.95 plus shipping($10.00 in US)

Options: Jersey Blue Collision

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          “Sickles-Just Before”
        12" x 20" Print

If  General Daniel Sickles had merely missed the Battle of Gettysburg he still would have led a most interesting life. Killer of Francis Scott Key’s son in highly publicized love triangle. The first use of temporary insanity as a legal defense. An affair with the former Queen of Spain. Scandals galore-both in and out of the Military.

All of these paled when compared to the controversy that arose out of his actions during and after the Battle of Gettysburg.  Sickles was not held in high regard by the new commander of the Army of the Potomac, General George Meade, due to Sickles’ political connections and lack of military background.  Ordered by Meade to defend the left flank of the Union Army, Sickles fretted about the topography.  On his own he ordered his 10,000 man III Corps forward into a highly questionable salient leaving the most important natural feature of the vicinity, Little Round Top, undefended.

Meade was unaware of this until the Confederate attack began, too late for any adjustments. Due to the exposed and segmented position, Union reinforcements were fed into the area piecemeal, making cohesive command difficult.

Even with thousands of troops and additional artillery committed to the area, the location prized by Sickles, the high ground of the Peach Orchard, became untenable.  The above shows many of the nearly 40 Artillery pieces dispatched to the Peach Orchard desperately attempting to exit the scene before being overran by Confederate forces just beyond the horizon. Also visible are the Wentz and Sherfy houses and Barns along the Emmitsburg Pike. Sickles is gathering his staff near the Trostle Barn at right. Seconds later a bouncing Confederate cannon ball struck the mounted Sickles in the right leg, shattering both bones. Sickles was removed on a stretcher reputedly smoking a cigar and his active military career was over.

Despite his tactical miscues Sickles was loved by his troops and post war was active in the creation and preservation of the Gettysburg Battlefield. 

12" x 20" signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
Print on gloss canvas $35.95plus shipping($10.00 in US)
Framed with brass plate
$59.95 plus shipping($10.00 in US)

Options: Sickles-Just Before

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                                        “Wilcox Crosses the Spangler Farm”
                                                               
11” x 22”  Print

                   In 1862 Henry Spangler, who owned a farm on the Baltimore Pike  purchased a house and farm located 400 yards west of the Emmitsburg Pike, a mile south of Gettysburg.  Originally built in 1822 by Spangler’s Father in law, George Plank, the house was also just a few hundred yard east of what would become the Confederate Line on July 2nd and 3rd 1863.

                
Cadmus Wilcox’s Brigade, consisting of five Alabama regiments was a battle tested and cohesive unit. The brigade had performed with distinction at Chancellorsville and came to Gettysburg as part of Anderson’s Division with over 1700 effective troops.  Early on July 2nd Wilcox was ordered to form the right flank of the Confederate army and posted to the area near the Spangler Farm. Much of the area was below the view of Union forces on Cemetery Ridge.  At mid-day the 10th and 11th Alabama had a brief but sharp encounter with Federal troops in Pitzer’s Wood.  That firefight was major influence in General Sickles’ ill-advised decision to move his line forward.
            
                
Later in the afternoon Wilcox joined Longstreet’s eight brigades in precise echelon sequence.  Here we see the 14th Alabama crossing the yard of the Spangler house. In view behind are the 11th Alabama just south of Spangler Lane and the 10th Alabama further south. Also to the south is the Staub house and barn and smoke from confederate batteries located on Warfield ridge. 

            Wilcox’s attack overwhelmed the Union forces on the Emmitsburg Pike.  When the Alabamans  pushed forward into the Plum Run swale they faced the near suicidal charge of the 1st Minnesota. Combined with a lack of support from Anderson’s other Brigade the attack stalled and  the Brigade was forced back across the Pike. With further losses suffered during an ill fated supporting move the next day the brigade suffered more than 40% casualties during the 3 day battle.

11" x 22" signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
Print on gloss canvas $35.95plus shipping($10.00 in US)
Framed with brass plate
$59.95 plus shipping($10.00 in US)

Options: Wilcox Crosses the Spangler Farm

 

                                                                                                                



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