The Gettysburg Diographs by Dennis Morris
Historical Prints

2012 Portfolio-Our newest prints



118th Pennsylvania on Stony Hill
14" x 20" & 22"x 34"

The 118th had one of the more unusual nicknames in the Civil War.  They were known as the “Corn Exchange Regiment” due to their monetary sponsorship by the Philadelphia Corn Exchange. The Exchange paid the volunteer’s bounty and other expenses involving the creation of the Regiment.
            The 118th took heavy losses at Shepardstown and was heavily engaged at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville.  At Gettysburg the Corn Exchange served in Colonel William Tilton’s tiny (655 men in four regiments) Brigade in Barnes Division, V corps.  
            The V corps arrived at Gettysburg early on the 2nd of July, 1863.  Starting in reserve, as fighting started in the area of the III corps it was moved to the southern part of the Union position.  Along the way Strong Vincent’s Brigade was peeled off to assist on Little Round Top and the remaining two brigades of  Barnes’s division continued to another rocky eminence located on George Rose’s farm just west of a large and soon to be infamous Wheatfield.  There a rocky knoll fronted a small woodlot between the Wheatfield and several open fields next to Sherfy’s Peach Orchard. General Sickles of the III created a large salient at the Peach Orchard but to its left the area was weakly defended.
            Directly in front of the 118th was a narrow gap in Roses’ woodlot containing a small run and a farm road.   Prior to the 118th’s arrival Confederates of “Tige” Anderson had attacked from the woods closer to the Wheatfield but had been repulsed. It was clear more were coming as more Confederate ranks could be seen crossing the Emmitsburg Road behind the Rose House.
            This scene shows the 7th South Carolina (left) and 3rd South Carolina of Kershaw’s Brigade attacking Stony Hill. The 118th held firm for a time Lt. Colonel James Gwynn refused back the right of his line to cover an overlap by the Southerners.
              Colonel Tilton, new to Brigade command, lost his nerve. The left wing of Kershaw’s Brigade had passed far to the right on the 118th.  Tilton did not know they had been battered by Union Artillery on the Wheatfield Road. With Barnes consent both brigades pulled off Stony Hill to a position behind the Wheatfield Road.  With that Kershaw’s men swept across woodlots and started to move into the Wheatfield.

$99.95  Museum size print-22" x 34"  
Signed limited edition (50)  Framed with brass plaque and certificate of authenticity. (add $20.00 Shipping in U.S.)



14” x 22”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity          

                      Print on Gloss Canvas                                                           $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)           
                      Framed with brass plate                                                       $59.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
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Wheatfield Road Artillery
12" x 36" Panorama

 After the Civil War, one of the reasons given by General Daniel Sickles to justfy his decision to defend the Peach Orchard area was his estimation that  it was a good artillery platform.   As July 2nd 1863 progressed more and more Union Batteries were sent to the to area.  These were not just III corps batteres directed by Sickles  but most of the 38 cannon that occupied the Peach Orchard area were from the Artillery reseseve and authorized by the the dynamic Union artillery chief, General Henry J. Hunt.

What is now known as Wheatfield Road was a farm lane running from  the Peach Orchard  to the Taneytown Road.  For the first 400 yards running west from the Emmitsburg Road,  30 muzzles had clear view to the south as Hood’s Division moved across their front to attack the Little Round Top, Houck’s Ridge and Rose Woods area.   Those cannon made life miserable and sometimes short for the 5 to 10.minutes the Southern soldier were exposed to their fury.

Sometime after 5 PM Kershaw’s Brigade emerged from the woods on Warfield’s Ridge. Intitially they headed east like the prior attackers and suffered similar punishment. Just after crossing the Emmitsburg Road they moved behind the Rose farm buildings. Kershaw  dispatched his three leftmost regiments to the north to dispatch the Union batteries that had proved so troublesome.  For a few hundred yards these regiments were hidden by a swale.

The scene above shows the moment that Kershaw’s threat became apparent to the the Union Artillery. On the left is the rightmost Napoleon  of Bigelow’s  9th Massachusetts battery. To its right are the Ordnance rifles of Phillip’s 5th Massachusetts battery .  Moving in between the two Bay State units is the  3rd Michigan pulling back from their skirmish line. Further to the right four more Union batteries blend into each other. Just visible are the Wentz and Sherfy Barns. A group of III Corps staff officers recognize the danger and the 141st Pennsylvania lies low to the ground  to avoid the shelling of 30 Confederate guns that zeroed in on the  Peach Orchard.

Ironically Kershaw’s threat self destructed a few moments later as a mistaken order directed the southerners to flank to the right directly in front of the Union cannon.  The South Carolinans  suffered frightful losses before retiring back to the swale.

12” x 36”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity          

                      Print on Gloss Canvas                                                           $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)           
                      Framed with brass plate                                                       $69.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)

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8th Georgia in Rose’s Muck
12" x  30" Panorama

 The 8th Georgia Regiment arrived in Virginia in 1861 and participated in 1st Manassas as part of Bartow’s Brigade.  The 8th came to Gettysburg with 311 men as part of  “Tige“ Anderson’s Brigade of Hood’s Division. In Longstreet’s late afternoon attack on July 2, 1863 the 8th Georgia was led by Colonel John Towers. Initially they  moved east across the Emmitsburg Road and suffered from Union artillery located in the Peach Orchard. Some relief arrived in a 30- some acre woodlot owned by George Rose. There Anderson’s brigade swung generally to the North. Off in that direction beyond the woods  the men of the 8th could see glimpses of  golden wheat. Shells from an unseen northern battery exploded overhead with little physical effect but with obvious damage to nerves.  As they descended a slight slope leading to Rose’s Run  it became clear the Union lines were directly ahead.

This Panoramic  print shows the scene as the 8th Georgia crosses the low swampy area of Rose Run during the first of at least three assaults on the Wheatfield.  The 17th Maine  is at the foreground and had the advantage of a low stone wall to the right. Their right flank was exposed by a hasty withdrawal of troops on their right but a quick refusal by the 17th along a snake fence kept the Eighth from pushing into the field. The Eighth did manage to advance it flag to the stone wall where hand to hand fighting ensued before Anderson pulled his brigade back.  The 8th Georgia continued to fight until dusk as both sided flooded the area with new troops. Eventually the Wheatfield was carried but the 8th suffered a staggering 168 casualties (54%) .

     12” x 30”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity          

                      Print on Gloss Canvas                                                           $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)           
                      Framed with brass plate                                                       $69.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)

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48th Alabama Above the Den
11" x  22"


            The 48th Alabama was recruited from the Sand Hill region of Northeast Alabama and sometimes were known as the “Mountaineers.” The new regiment came east in the Spring of 1862 and were part of Stonewall Jackson’s “foot cavalry.” With some fortune prior to Gettysburg the 48th only took heavy losses at Sharpsburg. At Gettysburg the 48th was part of Law’s Brigade in Hood’s Division. In the early hours of July 2, 1863 the 48th arose and its 374 men made a 26 mile march from Chambersburg to the scene of battle. Barely having time to rest the 48th took its spot on the far right wing of Longstreet’s attack on the Union line.  Due to some misdirection within the Brigade the 48th was moved off the left and directed to assist the 44th Alabama in taking a Union battery perched atop the rocks of Devil’s Den. Taking a path to flank the battery they moved, true to their nickname, through the wooded lower portion of Round Top.            
            In the scene above the 48th emerges from the woods to attack the 4th Maine. Below are the rocks of Devil’s Den. In the far distance is South Mountain, which the 48th had marched over that morning.   To the left the 44th Alabama struggles through the rocks of the Slaughter Pen. Colonel James Sheffield observes the attack as a courier approaches him with a vital message. Shortly before General Hood was wounded by an exploding artillery shell and forced off the field.  With that Evander Law would assume command of the Division and Sheffield would take over Law’s Brigade. This change caused great confusion for the rest to the day for the entire division. The 48th continued pushing back both the 4th Maine and later the 40th New York from what became known as the Valley of Death. The day was not over for the Mountaineers as they then joined in on the attack on the most valuable territory in the sector-Little Round Top. After clearing the Union Troops out of the Valley the 48th wheeled right and attacked straight up the open rocky slope. Initially, the 48th seemed to turn the tide. The 16th Michigan began to turn and withdraw. The summit and Hazlett’s battery were open for conquest. In moments the 48th came under heavy fire from its left as Paddy O’Rourke’s large 140th NY poured over the crest of the hill sending the Southerners back.  The attacks resulted in 106 casualties. Officers were hit especially hard and by evening the Regiment was commanded by Lieutenants Burk and Ewing.
                       
 11” x 22”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity          

                      Print on Gloss Canvas                                                           $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)           
                      Framed with brass plate                                                       $59.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)

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A Two Print Study of the 3rd Maine

Rose Farm Skirmishers
11" x 22"

 The 3rd Maine Regiment was recruited majorly of Kennebec lumbermen. According to Fox's Regimental Losses the rugged recruits averaged 170 pounds.  The 3rd Maine arrived on the front in time for first Bull Run in July 1861.  After participating in nearly all of the battles of the Virginia Campaigns of 1861-63 the 3rd arrived at Gettysburg with only 210 officers and men.  Colonel Moses Lakeman led the 3rd Maine as part of Hobart Ward’s brigade of III Corps. 

Early on July 2, 1863 Ward’s Brigade assembled in the Trostle Farm area. Eventually the bulk of the Brigade was assigned to the Devil’s Den-Houck’s Ridge area. In mid morning due to confusion in the Union command, John Buford’s cavalry Brigade was removed from its screening assignment along the Emmitsburg Road.  This concerned General Dan Sickles of the III Corps.  The 3rd Maine was detached with along with the 100 rifles from Hiram Berdan’s 1st USS Sharpshooters to the area of the Peach Orchard, where they were sent westerly to probe the woods west of the Emmitsburg Road.

This detachment encountered the Confederate regiments of Cadmus Wilcox’s Brigade. A hot firefight ensued that convinced Sickles the Confederates were targeting his command.  After withdrawing from Biesecker’s Woods the regiment was stationed in skirmish line to the south of Sherfy’s Peach Orchard and north of the Rose Farm.

Around 4 PM the Confederates did attack the III corps.  Looking to the south from their skirmish position the 3rd could see four brigades of Southern troops moving to the west.  About one hour later General Joseph Kershaw’s Brigade appeared out of the Warfield ridge woods and wheeled to the left directly at the 3rd Maine.  In the scene above the 3rd falls back after a hot skirmish as Kershaw cleared the stone buildings of the Rose Farm.  The southern troops visible are the 2nd South Carolina (on left) and  the 3rd South Carolina Battalion.   After moving back to the Peach Orchard the 3rd was lucky to escape annihilation in Barksdale’s onslaught   but suffered nearly 60% casualties in the day’s action.

11” x 22”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)

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                                                           ---    3rd Maine- Part 2   ---


Peach Orchard Skirmishers
12"x 20" and 22" x 34"

   The scene above portrays the right flank of the 3rd   at the edge of the Emmitsburg Road and the corner of Sherfy's Peach Orchard.  The 3rd Maine spent at least 2 hours in this area with artillery fire from both sides screaming overhead. Here they   prepare to fall back before Kershaw’s left wing approaches the Peach Orchard. The Southern troops visible are the  the 8th South Carolina Regiment (nearest), the  3rd South Carolina Battalion and portions of the 2nd South Carolina.  Kershaw's first attack on the Peach Orchard was defeated by the massed artillery in the Peach Orchard and a mistaken Confederate order. However in later action the 3rd was lucky to escape annihilation in Barksdale’s onslaught  suffering nearly 60% casualties in the day’s action.


       $99.95  Museum size print-22" x 34"   Signed limited edition (50)  Framed with brass plaque and certificate of authenticity. (add $20.00 Shipping in U.S.)

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12” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)

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Palmetto Peril
11" x  22"

                The 2nd South Carolina Regiment (the Palmetto Regiment)served perhaps the longest tour of duty of any Confederate Regiment.    Formed in January 1861 the Regiment took part in the first shot on Fort Sumter on April 12 1861 and continued in service until General Johnston’s surrender at Bennett House, North Carolina, April 26, 1865, several weeks after Appomattox.  The regiment’s first Colonel was Joseph Kershaw, one of the South finest “citizen soldiers.”
           
By Gettysburg Kershaw commanded a full Brigade containing the Palmetto Regiment. Part of Hood’s Division of Longstreet’s corps, Kershaw was ordered to attack the Union Line near the Peach Orchard and Stony Hill on the late afternoon of July 2, 1863.  The 2nd had 412 men commanded by  Colonel  John D. Kennedy  making it one of the larger veteran regiments  in the Battle.  

            Moving across the fields toward the Rose Farm the brigade was raked by Artillery fire from the Peach Orchard.  At the Rose Farm, Kershaw divided his force into 2 wings. The 2nd South Carolina and 2 other regiments were wheeled to the left to attack the deadly batteries in the Peach Orchard and along Wheatfield Road.  This move was a surprise to the Federals, who had virtually no infantry in position to contest this move. There was plenty of artillery to contend with, as soon as the three regiments moved out of the hollow of Rose Run.  The regiments moved uphill through a corn and barley field directly into the face of the Union guns.  Ignoring the fire the 2nd moved quickly and at 100 yards could see Union gunners start to retreat.  At that moment a mistaken order was received by the three regiments signaling a move to the right flank.  Being veterans, the troops followed the fatal orders, moving straight across the front of 28 union cannon. For several minutes the 2nd took fearsome losses until the mistake was realized and the regiment turned to safety in a swale near the base of the Barley field. Ironically the fatal move spooked Union Brigade commander William Tilton who abandoned the nearly Stony Hill eventually leading to its capture.
            The scene above shows the 2nd as the mistake was realized and shows the perilous position of Kershaw’s left  wing, moving across the barrels of the Union Artillery on Wheatfield Road.  

11” x 22”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)


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