The Gettysburg Diographs by Dennis Morris
Historical Prints

2011 Portfolio

Georgia Tide

Gettysburg- July 2nd, 1863

General Henry Benning, a native of Columbus Georgia was a state legislator and Supreme Court judge.  After organizing and commanding the 17th Georgia Regiment, Benning assumed command of his brigade in April 1863, though he had led the brigade  in battle at both at 2nd Manassas and Sharpsburg.     In the late afternoon of July 2, 1863 his four regiments the 15th, 20th 17th  and 2nd Georgia volunteers were arranged from north to south on Warfield Ridge.

 Initially Benning’s Georgians were to have followed Evander’s Law’s brigade northeasterly toward the suspected Union line. Harassed by skirmishers, Law’s brigade veered to their right toward the Round Tops . When the time came for Benning to advance the Alabamans of Law’s brigade were out of sight. General John Bell Hood has just been severely wounded and control of the Division passed to Law who could not be immediately located. Benning moved his brigade toward a  “Mountain” directly ahead that held a Union Battery, the 4th N. Y.  This “Mountain” was Houck’s Ridge and Little Round Top. These two elevations may have appeared as one from the distance, but it was clear that this battery dominated the area. 

Units from Robertson’s and Law’s Brigade had met stiff resistance in the area ahead.  Benning’s left two regiments arrived as the charge  of 124th NY had reached  the valley in front of Houck’s Ridge.  Overwhelmed by numbers the 124th NY retreated.   Segments of the 44th Alabama and 1st Texas each captured the Union battery on Houck’s Ridge but it could not be held   The 4th Maine and the 99th Pennsylvania both arrived on the crest and re-secured the Union Guns.  

By this time the Benning was able to sort out the interspersed lines of the Georgians, Texans Arkansans and Alabamans that clogged the valley.  Here we see the 20th Georgia moving up the Triangular field.  To their right the   17th Georgia moves toward Devil’s Den and the Slaughter Pen over the small rise now known as Benning’s Knoll.  In the woods to left the 15th Georgia and 3rd Arkansas began to clear the Federals out of Rose Woods.  In the center members of Company G and H  of the 1st Texas retreat across the triangular field after being chased off the ridge by 2 union regiments. Those regiments, the 99th Pennsylvania and the 4th Maine still hold Houck’s Ridge but eventually the superior Confederate numbers turn the tide and Ward’s entire Brigade was forced back after contesting the casualty strewn ground for more than two hours.

11” x 22”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping
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The above scene as mapped in The Gettysburg Campaign Atlas -Philip Laino 2009 Gatehouse Press,  Dayton Ohio. Copyrighted material reprinted with permission. An excerpt from map 2-37:

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Duel in Rose Woods

   Gettysburg- July 2nd, 1863

         

             The 86th New York was mustered into service in November 1861. While recruits came from Onondaga, Schuyler and Chemung County the vast majority the regiment’s men came from the large rural county of Steuben thus leading to the unit’s nickname, the “The Steuben Rangers.” 

The Rangers fought hard at 2nd Manassas, Chancellorsville and Brandy Station before arriving at Gettysburg on July 1st 1863.  Part of Ward’s Brigade of the III Corps they were commanded by Lt. Colonel Benjamin Higgins of Syracuse.  On the afternoon of July 2nd, Ward’s brigade was assigned the left flank of the Union Army on a ridge that terminated in a large pile of dolomite boulders now known as Devil’s Den.  The 86th was initially placed between its sister units, the 124th NY and the 20th Indiana.  The 86th’s line ran from near Smith’s battery into the Rose woodlot. 

When the Confederate attack came in late afternoon the 86th most likely fired the first regimental volley of the bloody 2nd day against the 3rd Arkansas.  After firing the Rangers pushed forward with the 20th Indiana and drove the westerners back across Rose Run.  The Confederates regrouped and slowly advanced up the wooded hillside tree by tree, rock by rock. Eventually they were halted at a rocky ledge now named for their Colonel, VanNoy Manning.  For at least an hour the fight was a standstill with each side fruitlessly looking for an advantage.  Eventually the 15th Georgia from Benning’s Brigade and also the 59th Georgia from Anderson’s Brigade moved into that section of Rose woods and the finally the numbers favored the attackers.  Lt. Colonel Higgins was wounded and succeeded by Major Lansing.  With both the 20th Indiana and 86th NY almost out of ammunition and its left flank in danger Ward’s Brigade was ordered from its line.  Considering the ferocity of the fighting the exit was made in good order. 

Here we see the fresh troops of the 15th Georgia pushing the 86th NY almost to the top of Rose Woods. In the background the battle on Little Round Top is raging. Thanks to the effort by Ward’s   Brigade the Union troops on Little Round top faced only one Southern Brigade rather than three.  

 

12" x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)


               22" x 34"  Museum Size Framed  (new)   Signed limited edition (50)  Stretched Canvas    
             With brass plate and  certificate of authenticity            $99.99 Plus Shipping (10.00 in U.S.)

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Red Diamonds in the Wheatfield

Gettysburg - July 2, 1863

               While another regiment from Maine commands the liWhile another regiment from Maine commands the lion’s share of public awareness, it can be argued that the 17th Maine fought the hardest of the Down Easters. At Gettysburg the 17th was in DeTrobriand’s Brigade, assigned the unenviable task of holding the gap between Ward’s Brigade on Devil’s Den and the Peach Orchard, a huge distance with few natural defensive positions. As it became clear that Longstreet was attacking from the southwest, the 17th was moved to a low stone wall on the southern part of George Rose’s Wheatfield.  A more claustrophobic position could not be imagined. The wall was in a natural basin hemmed in on the left and rear by the extension of Houck’s Ridge and the right by Stony Hill and a grove of alders. In the immediate front was Rose Woods. The enemy could emerge from any or all of the three directions. If that was not disconcerting enough, immediately to their rear Winslow’s Battery of 6 Napoleons was firing over their heads into Rose Woods, presumably at the Confederates.  was in DeTrobriand’s Brigade, assigned the unenviable task of holding the gap between Ward’s Brigade on Devil’s Den and the Peach Orchard, a huge distance with few natural defensive positions. Maine fought the hardest of the Down Easters. At Gettysburg the 17

         For the next 2 hours the 17th fought against elements of 3 Southern Brigades holding a weak defensive position against heavy odds. Out of ammunition they were finally ordered to pull back to the north end of the Wheatfield.  There Division Commander, General David Birney order them to give one more effort to gain time for the arrival of Caldwell’s II Corps Division. They set bayonets and charged back down the slope of the Wheatfield, stalling the Confederate advance and allowing Winslow to withdraw safely.

          Here we see the scene about 45 minutes into the fight. Anderson’s 11th Georgia is applying pressure on the stone wall. Two Union Regiments to 17th’s right had evacuated Stony Hill and created a potentially fatal gap.  In response Lt. Colonel Charles Merrill thinned his line and moved 3 companies to the Virginia rail fence that cut diagonally across the base of the Wheatfield.  This refusal was done just in time to repel elements of the 8th Georgia who had nearly outflanked the 17th Maine.

11” x 22”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)
 
       
                   22" x 34"  Museum Size Framed  (new)   Signed limited edition (50)  Stretched Canvas    
             With brass plate and  certificate of authenticity            $99.99 Plus Shipping (10.00 in U.S.)


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The above scene as mapped in The Gettysburg Campaign Atlas -Philip Laino 2009 Gatehouse Press,  Dayton Ohio. Copyrighted material reprinted with permission. An excerpt from map 2-58:


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Detailed View of this large print

Rose Barn Loft

                                                                Gettysburg- July 2nd, 1863

            George Rose owned a large farm located on the easterly side of the Emmitsburg Road about two miles south of the Gettysburg. The Rose farm was centered on a large stone barn built in  1824.  From ground to peak the barn rose more than 30 feet above the surrounding terrain.

On July 2nd 1863, General Joseph Kershaw’s Brigade of nearly 2200 South Carolinians stepped out from the woods on Warfield Ridge and headed towards the Rose Farmstead and a small Stony Hill behind it.  After taking losses from the Union batteries along Wheatfield Road while crossing the fields on the west side of the Emmitsburg Road, the brigade’s left wing passed below the sight line of the Union artillery into a swale north of the Rose Barn. Kershaw’s left three regiments wheeled up the hill toward the Peach Orchard and Wheatfield road.  For whatever reason there were only Blue clad skirmishers between Kershaw’s troops and the Union Cannons. The union batteries were undoubtedly shocked to see the Confederates coming over the crest of the hill and some units were reported to have commenced spiking their guns.

The print shows the scene as it appeared from Rose Farm loft. On the left is the Emmitsburg road and respectively, the 8th S. Car., 3rd S. Car. Battalion and the 2nd S. Carolina Regiment.  Skirmishers from the 3rd Maine are pulling back into the Peach Orchard and the danger to the 30 plus Union Guns on Wheatfield Road is clear.  Trostle farm, the site of General Dan Sickles’ Headquarters is just visible on the extreme left. The Wentz house and barn at the corner of Wheatfield Road and the Emmitsburg Road is also visible with the Sherfy, Spangler and Klingle Barns further to the North.

 Moments later, all three regiments received and followed a mistaken order to “right flank.”  This maneuver put the South Carolinians in a terrible spot as they took shot after shot of canister from the Union cannons only a few hundred feet away.  Two days later when Union officers surveyed the field south of the Wheatfield Road the bodies of over 150 South Carolinians outlined their ranks where the fateful maneuver occurred.

12” x 30”   signed limited edition Panoramic print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $45.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $69.95 plus shipping
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The above scene as mapped in The Gettysburg Campaign Atlas -Philip Laino 2009 Gatehouse Press,  Dayton Ohio. Copyrighted material reprinted with permission. An excerpt from map 2-72:

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                                   "Dusk on Little Round Top"

    Gettysburg - July 2, 1863

               The 4th Alabama Regiment was recruited in the early day of the war and came to the Army of Northern Virginia in May of 1861. The regiment fought proudly from 1st Manassas to Appomattox. At Gettysburg the 4th Alabama started the day on July 2, 1863 near Chambersburg Pa. Waking at  2:00 AM Law’s Brigade marched the 26 miles over South Mountain to the south end of Seminary Ridge. With only a few minutes to rest the Brigade moved off with instructions to “Take those heights”.  Within half an hour the 4th Alabama had began the first of several attempts to take Little Round Top. The Union Brigade commanded by  Strong Vincent  and specifically the 83rd Pa. had a nearly invulnerable position part way up the rocky hill.  Colonel Scruggs, dismounted by his superior’ orders, soon passed out from the heat and exhaustion.  The Regiment continued on working from boulder to boulder looking for a sign of weakness above. Several times the regiment regrouped in the trees at the base of Round Top.  The culmination of the battle came as the sun was setting and both flanks of Vincent’s line were challenged. The 4th Alabama moved forward again to support but the result was no different due to desperate charges by the 140th NY and 20th Maine        

                 This diograph shows the 4th Alabama  in its final effort. The location is just at the edge of the Woods near what is now Warren Avenue .No doubt the troops sensed the futility of their effort but on they went in the hope that their comrades down the line could carry the heights.In the background elements of Benning’s and Robertson Brigade are assembling to make a final charge across the Valley of Death.

12” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping
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                                                     “Warren and Sykes”

                                                                Gettysburg- July 2nd, 1863

              Gouverneur Kemble Warren is generally and rightfully known as one of the “Heroes of Little Round Top.”   General Warren’s fortuitous arrival at the top of the hill in the mid-afternoon of July 2 1863 is one of the most compelling sagas of the battle.  Warren’s ability to recognize the danger and his continued efforts to bring Union forces to the threatened hilltop are memorialized in Gettysburg’s most  dramatic statues.  Before taking the assignment of Chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac Warren had been a brigade commander in the V corps.

             In striking contrast Warren’s former Division commander General George Sykes is one of only 2 union corps commanders not honored with a statue on the battlefield. (The other is General Sickles-who modestly claimed the whole battlefield was his monument)  Sykes was promoted to the leadership of the Union V Corps only days earlier when General George Meade was named Commander of the Army of the Potomac.  V corps brigades under the direction of Strong Vincent and Weed were crucial in the defense of Little Round Top.   Sykes played an active role in moving the V corps brigades to the aid of Sickles’ over extended III corps. It is difficult to fault Sykes’ performance that day as the South end of the battlefield was a triage affair with parts of four corps involved and intermingled.  Perhaps due to post battle sniping by Sickles and Sykes’ West Point nickname of “Tardy George” his reputation was marginalized.  A year later he was consigned to duty on the Western frontier and General Warren was given command of the V corps. Ironically an incident on the last days of the war put Warren’s reputation in jeopardy for many years. 

           The above scene depicts a meeting between Sykes and Warren in the late stages of the Battle.  While no record of such a meeting exists it seems likely.  Warren was on the hill at least until Hazlett’s battery was in place and probably through the attack of the 140th NY  At that time Sykes was present on Little Round Top and to the North of Hazlett’s battery.  As Warren had such strong interplay with the V Corps it would seem likely that a meeting with Sykes would have been inevitable. The site depicted is just below and north of the present Warren statue and the time is during the withdrawal of Ward’s brigade. Also in the picture is Chauncey B. Reese, Ranald S. Mackenzie and Washington A. Roebling from Warren’s Staff and Sykes’ Adjutant Lieut. Col. Fred. T. Locke.

15” x 15”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping
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A Charge Too Far

 Gettysburg- July 2nd 1863

The 124th New York Regiment was comprised of men from Orange County in the Catskill Mountain region.  Dubbing themselves the “Orange Blossoms” they had shown fight and taken heavy losses at Chancellorsville in May of 1863.  Some believe their actions at Chancellorsville inspired a future Orange County resident, Stephan Crane, to write “The Red Badge of Courage.”

In the mid afternoon of July 2, 1863 the 238 men of the 124th were stationed near Captain James Smith’s 4th NY Battery on the south end of Houck’s Ridge near the rocks of Devil’s Den. To the west was a triangular shaped field leading down to Rose Run and the opposite hillside of pasture, small woodlots and boulders that led to the ridge near the Emmitsburg Road.  When Hood’s division of 7000 Confederates advanced out of the Woods on Warfield Ridge the 124th had a clear and unsettling view.

The 1st Texas advanced through the dangerous fire from Smith’s battery and pushed back the Union skirmishers. Soon the Texans arrived at a stone wall on the west side of the triangular field and directly threatened the battery who could not depress its fire enough to repel the Confederates. The 124th moved to a position kneeling just behind the crest of the hill and waited for the inevitable rebel advance. After regrouping the Texans moved swiftly up the field.  With the Texans less than 50 yards away and Smith preparing to abandon his four cannon the 124th  rose as one and delivered  a powerful volley. The 1st  Texas waivered but held. After an exchange of volleys, the 124th’s Colonel, A. Van Horne Ellis had his horse brought up and ordered a charge.  The 124th responded with vigor and bayonets. They drove the Texans down the triangular field, over the stone wall at the bottom and beyond Rose Run.  The price of the charge was steep. Hood’s second wave, Benning’s Brigade, descended into the valley and poured fire into the Orange Blossoms killing Colonel Ellis and Major James Cromwell. A that moment the left wing of 47th Alabama crested a knoll directly on the 124th’s left. The cross fire drove the New Yorkers  into the woods on the north of the triangular field. They staggered back to their former line at the crest with only 100 able troops.  The Orange Blossom’s bravery was unquestioned but their sacrifice only gained a brief respite for Smith’s battery and the rest of Ward’s brigade.

Here we see the charge as it looked from the “D shaped field” on  Big Round Top. The Orange Blossoms are at their furthest point of advance.  Benning’s Georgians are firing from across Rose Run and the 47th  Alabama has just made their surprise arrival in the foreground. Colonel Ellis is still mounted in the center. His bravery dissuaded some of the Southern troops from firing at him but that sentiment was not shared by all.  

12” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on Gloss Canvas                                                              $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                          $59.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)

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The above scene as mapped in The Gettysburg Campaign Atlas -Philip Laino 2009 Gatehouse Press,  Dayton Ohio. Copyrighted material reprinted with permission. An excerpt from map 2-34:


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