The Gettysburg Diographs by Dennis Morris
Historical Prints
2009 Portfolio


 -------New for 2009-------




140th NY Arrives
Gettysburg - July 2, 1863


                         Though he was born in Ireland, his name destined his family’s move to the United States.  Colonel Patrick Henry O'Rorke grew up in Rochester New York, and graduated first in his class from West Point 1861 as the bookend to “goat” George Custer. In August 1862 he was given command of the 140th New York regiment, consisting of recruits from the Rochester area.
                        At Gettysburg on July 2, 1863 the 140th was heading with Weed’s brigade to assist the III corps near the Wheatfield. This was stopped at behest of General Warren, O’Rorke’s former commander, who was looking for more support for Little Round Top.  O’Rorke led his men directly up the north slope of the hill and they arrived at the most opportune moment for the Union. Three southern regiments from General John Bell Hood’s Division were threatening the right flank of Vincent’s brigade.  The small 16th Michigan was getting hemmed in and started to crumble. At that moment the 140th NY came over the hill and formed its attack in company sized double ranks. It is doubtful the first company had time to load before cresting the boulder-strewn hill. Companies G and A took the brunt of the assault by the 526-man regiment.
                       Just after O’Rorke shouted “Down this way, boys!” he was mortally wounded in the neck by a southern bullet.  Despite this setback and galling fire from the 48th Alabama the sheer size of the 140th NY was too much for the exhausted Southern troops.
Much has been made of the 20th Maine’s efforts on the Little Round Top that day but it is arguable the O’Rorke and the 140th were equally decisive in holding that ground.  Indeed if Vincent’s right flank had fallen Benning’s Brigade was poised to enter the gap and put an overwhelming force on the hill.
                    The diograph show the decisive moment just after company A and G have formed and are able to return fire. O’Rorke is in the center just moments before he was hit.       


14” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)
 22" x 34"  Museum Size Framed  (new)  
Signed limited edition (50)  Stretched Canvas    
             With brass plate and  certificate of authenticity            $99.99 Plus Shipping (10.00 in U.S.) 
                     
         
Options
______________________________________________________________



Vincent’s Challenge
Gettysburg - July 2, 1863

           Like many of the Southern Brigade Commanders, Strong Vincent was a lawyer prior to the war.  Educated at Harvard he returned to his native Erie Pa. in 1859.  Joining the army as a private in 1861 he rose to colonel of the 83rd Pa. and then brigade commander.  At Gettysburg Vincent’s Brigade was part of Barnes division of the V corps.
              In the mid afternoon of July 2, 1863 the V corps was moving to the Union left.  Somewhere near the Wheatfield a courier from General Sykes approached looking for General Barnes. Sykes was requesting a brigade to move to Little Round top. Vincent perceived the necessity and without direct orders turned his brigade toward the partially cleared hill. Vincent and his bugler Oliver Norton circled the hill ahead of the brigade to scout the position. Coming out onto the clearing on the summit with Vincent’s flag they were immediately targeted by Confederate Artillery.    After seeking cover Vincent laid out a line on the military crest (about ¾ of the way up the hill) running from a spur on the south wooded side to about halfway across the clearer westerly side of the rocky eminence. From left to right Vincent’s regiments included the 20th Maine, the 83rd Pa., the 44th NY, and the 16th Michigan. Skirmishers were sent out and almost immediately returned signaling the Confederate forces were pushing through the woods on the lower shoulder of Big Round Top.
             The scene shown in the diograph shows portions of the 44th NY and the 16th Mich. being attacked by the 4th and 5th Texas.   Both Texas regiments had emerged from the woods to the left.  Below the battle for Devil’s Den is reaching its conclusion.  Benning’s 17th Ga. and the Law’s 48th Alabama are pushing back the 40th NY and 99th Pa.   
                In about 30 minutes the 48th Alabama will join the two Texas regiments and nearly succeed in dislodging Vincent’s brigade. While rallying his troops Vincent was struck in the groin by a rebel shot. He died five days after being promoted to general.   

11” x 22”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
Options
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________



 


Alabamans at Vincent’s Spur
Gettysburg - July 2, 1863

                     Vincent’s Spur is a plateau-like extension off the southeast end of Little Round Top.  At the commencement of Longstreet’s attack it was doubtful that the Confederate command knew of it’s existence. Yet,  it would be scene of the some of the day’s most desperate fighting. 
                    The 15th Alabama Regiment had begun the day a full county away. As part of Law’s brigade they had been encamped near Chambersburg. Awakened at 2 am they made the 26 mile march over South Mountain through Cashtown to Herr Ridge and then south to the jump off for the attack on Warfield Ridge.
                    The path from Warfield Ridge to the spur was hardly direct. Before reaching Plum Run they were confronted by the 2nd US Sharpshooters.  That pushed the whole brigade off to the right. The 15th ended up on the right flank when the two regiments on the left were shifted to fill a gap on the opposite side. For reasons known only to Colonel William Oates, the 15th was directed to move to the summit of Round Top. After completing the exhausting climb over boulders, and fallen trees, the 15th and the 44th Alabama rested on the top of the Mountain while the sound of battle could heard below in the Devils Den and on the eastern slope of Little Round Top.  A few minutes later a courier from General Law ordered the two regiments to join in a the attack on Little Round Top.
                  The 47th moved down the hill into the hollow and soon saw Union troops in a strong position utilizing some of the large boulders and the military crest.  This was the 20th Maine Regiment, and their duel was memorable struggle.
                   The scene depicted is the first attack of the 15th Alabama. There would be at least four more, shifting further and further to the right in an attempt to out flank the Union line. Ultimately the exhausted 15th Regiment  suffered 178 casualties and was pushed off the spur by a desperate bayonet attack by the 20th Maine.      

14” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
22" x 34"  Museum Size Framed  (new)   Signed limited edition (50)  Stretched Canvas    
             With brass plate and  certificate of authenticity            $99.99 Plus Shipping (10.00 in U.S.)

Options






Pine Tree Warriors
Gettysburg - July 2, 1863

                  The 20th Maine regiment was organized in August 1862. Prior to Gettysburg the regiment had seen limited combat. The 20th Maine was part of Vincent’s Brigade, Barnes Division, Sykes’ V corps.  Arriving at Gettysburg at mid morning on July 2nd, the V was held in reserve. Eventually the V corps was moved to the Union right. During that move the situation became critical. Not only was it becoming apparent to the Union Command that an attack was imminent in that area, but the III corps was not where General Meade (charitably speaking) intended it to be.
                    General Gouverneur Warren of Meade’s staff hurried to Little Round Top to assess the situation. There were no troops there though he could see Ward’s line covering Houck’s Ridge to the immediate front of Little Round Top.  Looking into the woods to the southeast he could see Confederate troop considerably to the south of the Union flank.  Warren sent out couriers to find the troops to cover the vulnerable right. 
                       Somewhere near the Wheatfield a courier from General Sykes approached Vincent’s brigade looking for General Barnes. Sykes was requesting a brigade to move to Little Round Top. Vincent perceived the necessity and without direct orders turned his brigade toward the partially cleared hill. Initially the 16th Michigan was placed on the left flank but then was moved to the right leaving the 20th Maine to cover a low ridge in the woods running south of the peak of Little Round Top. Vincent assured Colonel Joshua Chamberlain of the 20th Maine that his position represented the Left flank of the Union army and he was to hold it.
                      For some time Chamberlain could only hear the sounds of battle off to his right as Devil’s Den heated up and later the center of Vincent’s line came under attack. Finally off to the South the men of the 20th saw the legs of Southern Troops approaching-the upper bodies of the Alabamans were still covered by the foliage that had been grazed up to neck level by cattle. This gave the Chamberlain a few more moments to prepare. 
                    The scene portrayed is just moment after the first Union volley. The 15th Alabama still pushes forward through the wooded haze. Several time that evening the attacker would reach the Union line only to be pushed back in hand to hand combat.  
After more than an hour of desperate fighting with both side nearly out of ammunition the 20th Maine fixed bayonet and charged down the hill an across the hollow and the Union flank was preserved.
         
 
14” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
22" x 34"  Museum Size Framed  (new)   Signed limited edition (50)  Stretched Canvas    
             With brass plate and  certificate of authenticity            $99.99 Plus Shipping (10.00 in U.S.)
 
Options

____________________________________________________________________________________________________







Wilcox’s Brigade Attacks
Gettysburg - July 2, 1863


                            The Confederate attack on the second day at Gettysburg commenced with two divisions of Longstreet’s Corps.  Starting on the south, brigade by brigade moved against the Union position en echelon.  The deliberate pacing of such an attack threatens the enemy with a breakthrough at the point of attack and causes him to shift forces to hold the breach.  Eventually the attacker finds a point that is weaker and the true breakthrough occurs. Longstreet’s eight brigades spent more than two hours setting up this scenario. Next in line was A.P Hills 2nd Corps with the Wilcox’s brigade leading the way.
                              Cadmus Wilcox was born in North Carolina and West Point classmate of George McClellan and Stonewall Jackson. At Gettysburg he brought four Alabama regiments with over 1700 men.   After General William Barksdale began his epic charge Wilcox moved out a little after 6 PM. Initially his southernmost regiment, the 8th Alabama became separated.    The center of brigade aimed directly at the Klingle farm on the east side of the Emmitsburg road. There they were opposed by Carr’s Brigade and Seeley’s Artillery battery.  As the Alabama brigade moved across the fields of the Spangler’s Farm Barksdale’s brigade swung left and moved up the Union line. This created an untenable salient at the Klingle house. Carr’s brigade, threatened in two directions, fell back quickly.
                         The diograph shows from left to right the 14th , 11th and 10th Alabama regiments just as they reach the Emmitsburg road. Barksdale’s forces are at a nearly right angle to the south. In the center the 5th and 11th New Jersey are firing their last organized volleys on either side of the lKlingle house. On the left is the Rogers house,with the Trostle house and barn just visible behind the klingle buildings.  Off to the right is the Sherfy house and just visible in the center distance is the 21st Mississippi firing upon Bigelow’s Battery in the Trostle orchard. 
                         At this moment Union forces were in retreat from the Wheatfield to the Codori Farm. Wilcox’s Alabamans now rejoined by the 8th continued on heading for Cemetery Ridge. As they passed across the low rough ground that was the source of Plum Run they were stunned by the fierce attack of the 1st Minnesota. 

10” x 24”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
Options
__________________________________________________________________________________________



Hazlett Scales Little Round Top

Gettysburg - July 2, 1863

           Lieutenant Charles Hazlett commanded  Battery A 5th US Artillery of the 5th Corps. He was born in Ohio and was a West Point graduate.  Battery A began the war at Bull Run and saw extensive action. At Gettysburg on day 2, when General Gouverneur K. Warren discovered the lack of troops on Little Round Top a series of events led V Corps Artillery commander Augustus Martin and Hazlett to ride to the top of the hill and assess it’s feasibility for artillery. While it was far from a perfect artillery platform due to the small amount of level ground at the top. Hazlett declared “The sound of my guns will be encouraging to our men….”
            The trek to the top was backbreaking for man and beast. Only one of the 10 pound Parrott rifles (weighing ing 2000 pounds with a 1000 pound limber) made it to the top on horsepower. The remaining 5 were literally dragged and pushed by manpower up the last rocky yards of Little Round Top. Not only the men of Battery A but stragglers from Vincent’s Brigade and General Warren himself joined in the effort.
             Like many other soldiers that day Hazlett had a premonition of death. Shortly after the battery arrived in place Hazlett was struck by sharpshooter’s bullet from the Devil’s Den/Valley of Death area. This happened as he was coming to the aid of General Stephen Weed, his former commander.
             Here we see the team of the #3 gun making it to the top of the hill.  On the left Captain Hazlett is surveying the scene below from his horse. Below the Southern forces spearheaded by Benning’s brigade are pushing back the 40th NY and portions of Ward’s brigade from the Devils Den area. The Smoke to the left is from the initial infantry attacks by the 4th and 5th Texas on Strong Vincent’s Brigade.
         Battery A now led by lieutenant B.F. Rittenhouse stayed on Little Round Top the rest of the evening and the next day provided vital support in shelling Pickett’s Advance.

14” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in the US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in US)
22" x 34"  Museum Size Framed  (new)   Signed limited edition (50)  Stretched Canvas    
             With brass plate and  certificate of authenticity            $99.99 Plus Shipping (10.00 in U.S.)
Options for "Hazlett"


Alexander Comes Up
Gettysburg - July 2, 1863
                                            


                         Colonel E. Porter Alexander was Longstreet’s Chief of Artillery. Only 28, the Georgia born West Point graduate was held in such high regard by the Confederate command that his opinion were taken over those of General Pendleton, the nominal army Artillery commander.
                         On July 2nd Alexander focused his attention and guns on a spot of ground near the intersection of the Emmitsburg road and the Millerstown Crossroad. Two peach orchards, destined to be known as “The Peach Orchard” capped this area. Federal artillery had filled the Peach Orchard until the Mississippi brigade of General William Barksdale chased them out in a memorable advance. 
                         From their position on Seminary ridge Alexander ordered forward more than 20 guns. They traveled across debris and casualty strewn fields until taking position on the east side of the Emmitsburg road in and north of the Peach Orchard.
From that vantage the Confederate batteries had a clear field of fire into retreating Union troops to the northeast. What lay beyond them was more problematic. Alexander now saw the extent of the Union line on Cemetery ridge  “that loomed up near 1000 yards beyond us, a ridge giving good cover behind it and endless fine positions for batteries.”
                          That ridge was not going to be taken that day.  Alexander’s work would continue the next day when he would command the largest artillery barrage of the war.
                         This view looks Northwesterly from the loft of the Wentz barn. The 3 left brigade of Barksdale are forcing the Excelsior brigade back. Just visible to the left of the Klingle and Rogers house is Cadmus Wilcox’s brigade who will seal the fate of the remaining III corps regiments.

12” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
           Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in the US)
           Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95 plus shipping($10.00 in the US)
Options for "Alexander"




The Futile Stand

Gettysburg July 2,1863
           The 141st Pa. was principally made up of men from the Northern Tier Counties of Pennsylvania. Formed in the summer of 1862, they fought hard at Chancellorsville and arrived at Gettysburg with only 209 men.
           As part of Graham’s Brigade they started July 2 near the Trostle Farm and moved to the Emmitsburg Road to support a 3rd Corps reconnaissance in force at midday. Following this they left only to return to the Peach Orchard area several hours later.  When the Confederate barrage began about 3:30 they suffered through crossfire from up to 40 cannon for nearly 2 hours.  When Kershaw’s Brigade threatened the Peach Orchard from the south they moved in front of the Wheatfield Road Batteries and held off the South Carolina regiments until Barksdale moved his Brigade in from the West to threaten the entire area.
           Pulling back from their former position the 141st changed its face to meet Barksdale’s 21st Mississippi. After supporting regiments retreated a Captain asked Col. Henry Madill if it was time to retire. Madill replied “I have no order to get out.” He would not have been faulted to have done otherwise.
         The scene shows the 141st making its solitary effort.  Looking down the Wheatfield Road from just behind the Wentz Barn the 141st has less than 100 men and is flanked by the much larger 21st Miss. Portions of the 21st Miss. were obscured by the smoke to the left and were almost onto the Keystoners before they were recognized.  Bigelow’s battery is to the left retiring toward Trostle Farm. When the 141st finished the day there remained only 49 men present, suffering a loss second only to that of the famed 1st Minnesota.  

      11” x 22”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity   

        Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping
($10.00 in the US)
       Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95  plus shipping($10.00 in the US)
Options for "Futile"



    Sickles Departs
Gettysburg - July 2, 1863


    General Daniel Sickles lived a life that deserves a Hollywood epic. Indeed, Sickles’ most recent biographer was Thomas Keneally, the author of the book that inspired the movie "Schindler’s List".  This biography, less prosaic, is entitled “American Scoundrel.”  No one-page summary can even touch the surface of Sickles’ persona, but July 2nd 1863 is somewhere in the top ten events of Sickles’ life.
    On his own initiative and in disregard (and possibly disobedience) of direct orders, Sickles ordered the 10,700 men of his III Corps to a remote and unsupported position ¾ of a mile in front of that intended by General George Meade.  By the time that Meade became aware of that move General James Longstreet had commenced his attack on the Union left flank. The result was a meat grinder for the III corps and reinforcements from four other Corps. 18 different Union brigades took the brunt of the assault, suffering a 38% casualty rate for the 23,000 infantry deployed. 
    This diograph shows the situation at about 6:45 PM from just behind the Trostle Barn. Barksdale’s brigade is moving north after sweeping Graham’s Brigade from the Peach Orchard. Soldiers from the 114th Pa. and 57th Pa. are retiring. The 73rd NY  and 57th Pa. make a brief stand at Trostle Lane while the rest of the Excelsior Brigade awaits the onslaught on the right.
    A the height of the attack an over shot from one the Confederate batteries  bounded across Trostle lane and struck the mounted Sickles in the leg, crushing it. An improvised tourniquet was applied saving his life but not his leg. True to Sickles’ eccentric history, the leg bones are still on display at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  At the far left you can see General Sickles being loaded onto an ambulance smoking a cigar.   

10” x 20”  signed limited edition print(100) with certificate of authenticity
       Print on canvas matte                                                               $35.95 plus shipping ($10.00 in the US)
       Framed with brass plate                                                            $59.95 plus shipping
(10.00 in the US)
Options for "Sickles"


__________________________________________________________________________________________

Lone Star Struggle

Gettysburg - July 2, 1863

                             

The 4th and 5th Texas regiments were proud members of Hood’s Texas brigade. Originally commanded by John Bell Hood, the Brigade had an auspicious record as one of the hardest hitting units in the Army of Northern Virginia. From the Peninsular campaign, through 2nd Manassas, Antietem and Fredricksburg, the Texas brigade seemed to find itself at a decisive juncture in each battle.

That continued at Gettysburg.  Now under the command of Jerome Robertson with Hood leading the division, the Brigade also included the 1st Texas and the 3rd Arkansas.  The Texas brigade was in the vanguard of Longstreet’s July 2nd attack. As the brigade advanced down into the Plum Run valley the 4th and 5th Texas guided on Law’s Brigade to their right. Due to this they became separated from the 1st Texas and 3rd Arkansas.  Eventually this separation placed the 4th and 5th Texas 300 yards and one hill to the east of the rest of the Brigade. That hill was Little Round Top. 

Command had now devolved to the regimental level as Robertson was with the remainder of the brigade. Hood was already wounded. Somehow the two “lost” regiments fused with the 4th Alabama of Law’s brigade and moved forward the rough and wooded ground at the base of Round Top. After pushing off skirmishers they emerged from the woods at the base of a 150 foot boulder strewn hill topped by Union troops. “A mountain goat might have revelled.” said one Texan.

This Diograph shows the 5th Texas’s view early in the initial attack. Just visible above are portions of the 16th Michigan and the 44th NY. The two Texas Regiments made perhaps five different attempts to take the hill. It is hard to fathom what type of courage that required. Both Colonels went down early but that did not stop the effort. The last attack came within yards of the top and was only stopped by a desperate charge by the 140th NY who arrived just as the Northern line began to crumble.     Of 409 men who went into action that day from the 5th Texas, 211 were killed, wounded, or missing.

14”x 20” signed limited edition (100) print
22" x 34"  Museum Size Framed  (new)   Signed limited edition (50)  Stretched Canvas    
             With brass plate and  certificate of authenticity            $99.99 Plus Shipping (10.00 in U.S.)
 
Options
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________








 

   To see the early stages of the Gettysburg Diographs see Gettysburg in Miniature.
Website Builder